Conditions

These are some of the most common conditions we regularly treat.  Of course, this isn’t an exhaustive list by any means; every patient and every foot is different, and we’ll address your unique individual needs. We’ll get you back on your feet so you can get back to doing what you love to do!

Ankle Pain

Ankle Sprain – A fall, a twist, or a blow can all be the culprits of a sprained ankle, which involves an injury to the ligaments that connect bones and joints. An untreated sprain could lead to chronic ankle instability or even a fracture.

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Arch Pain

Cavus Foot (High-Arched Foot) – A high arch is often caused by a neurological disorder, so accurate diagnosis is essential. People with very high arches are at a higher risk for hammertoe, calluses, pain, and instability.

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Barefoot Running

Proponents of running barefoot sometimes claim that running without shoes decreases the risk of plantar fasciitis and ankle sprains, but the verdict is still out. At Coastline, we treat injuries sometimes associated with barefoot running, such as Achilles strain, blisters, friction injuries, and abrasions.

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Bunions

(Hallux Abducto Valgus) – Known for their characteristic bump on the side of the big toe, bunions are actually a change in the bone formation in the foot, a progressive disorder that is usually inherited. A variety of non-surgical and surgical options are available to help bunion sufferers with pain, inflammation, and numbness.

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Calcaneal Apophysitis

Sever’s Disease – Though nicknamed “Sever’s Disease,” calcaneal apophysitis is actually just an inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. Stress or repetitive motion, such as through sports, can inflame the heel and cause pain and difficulty walking, particularly in children.

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Chronic Ankle Instability

Frequent sprains and stress to the ankle can cause the ankle to be so weakened that it turns or “gives way” while walking or even simply standing still. Often, non-surgical methods like physical therapy and braces will markedly help strengthen the ankle.

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Equinus

Equinus sufferers are unable to stretch their Achilles tendon, often because of diabetes or inherited muscle tightness, making it impossible to bring the front of the foot up towards the shin. Often, the methods used for compensation will cause related problems, like flatfoot, tendonitis, or shin splints.

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Flexible Flatfoot

One of the most common types of flatfoot, flexible flatfoot typically begins in childhood and progresses into adulthood. The word “flexible” refers to the fact that when the foot is standing, the arch will disappear only to reappear when weight is taken off the foot. Flexible flatfoot can cause pain and discomfort in various parts of the foot, ankle, and calf, but several non-surgical options are available.

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Fractures

In the foot alone, there are 26 bones. That’s a lot of opportunity for fracture, which presents often as swelling, redness, and pain. Depending on the location and nature of the fracture, various methods can be employed to allow the bone to heal.

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Ganglion Cyst

Ganglion cysts are among the most common of benign (harmless) tissue masses, but they can cause annoyance when wearing footwear. If the cyst can’t be removed through non-surgical procedures, such as aspirating fluid and injecting a steroidal solution, minor surgery may be necessary.

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Gout

The crystallization of uric acid in the joints, a condition called gout, can lead to moderate to severe pain and inflammation of joints in the foot. Gout is typically treated through medication, diet, fluids, and elevation of the feet.

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Haglund’s Deformity

Also known as the “pump bump,” due to the tendency of high-heeled shoes to cause the condition, Haglund’s Deformity refers to a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The redness, inflammation, and pain it causes can many times be treated by a variety of non-surgical methods, and the bump will subside.

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Hallux Rigidus

Meaning “rigid big toe,” hallux rigidus is exactly what it sounds like—a big toe that, whether through heredity or a disease like rheumatoid arthritis, can no longer flex at the joint. This condition can make performing even everyday duties exceedingly painful. Orthiotic devices and therapy can sometimes help sufferers of hallux rigid us.

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Hammertoes

An imbalance between muscles and tendons can cause toes to restrict, resulting in hammertoes. Irritation, corns, and difficulty wearing shoes make hammertoes an uncomfortable condition. Surgery could be needed to correct the toes if non-surgical options don’t work.

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Heel Pain

Plantar Fasciitis – Plantar fasciitis can cause intense heel pain due to an inflammation of a band of tissue that stretches from the heel to the toe. The pain usually affects most areas of the foot and increases as the condition progresses, causing speedy diagnosis and treatment to be a necessity.

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Ingrown Toenails

Tight-fitting shoes and socks and over-trimming can cause ingrown toenails, which occurs when the nail curves downward into the skin. A painful and fairly common condition, ingrown toenails can often be easily treated with or without surgery.

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Morton’s Neuroma

Intermetatarsal Neuroma – Frequently caused by wearing pointed or tight shoes, particularly high heels, Morton’s Neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue that can cause the sufferer to feel pain, irritation, and a peculiar feeling of something being inside the shoe. Sometimes, the condition can be treated by simply changing footwear and/or activity.

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Os Trigonum Syndrome

A small percentage of people are born with a diminutive extra bone in their heel, which, as the person grows, can begin to cause problems, particularly when the foot is flexed away from the calf. Although surgery may be required, symptoms can be treated with rest, ice, and oral medication.

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Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

Osteoarthritis, the breakdown of cartilage in our joints, can be especially debilitating when it involves the foot and/or ankle. Orthiotics, injections, and physical therapy can help increase mobility and reduce pain, but in some extreme cases, surgery is necessary.

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Plantar Fibroma

Fibrous knots within the arch of the foot are known as plantar fibroma, and we, as yet, don’t know a definitive cause for it. Plantar fibromas are fairly easy to diagnose and can usually be felt as a lump in the arch of the foot. Steroid injections, orthiotic devices, and physical therapy can help ease pain in this recurring condition.

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Plantar Wart

Verruca Plantaris – Warts are caused by a virus affecting the skin, and a plantar wart (that is, a wart on the bottom of the foot) is no exception. These warts can grow deep into the skin and are sometimes mistaken for a callus. If a doctor discovers a plantar wart, which may or may not be painful, the usual treatments involve freezing the wart off, laser therapy, topical or oral medications, or surgery.

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Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

PTTD is a type of flatfoot that usually presents in adulthood as a result of changes in the tendon that supports the arch (the posterior tibial tendon). Sufferers can experience pain, swelling, a change in their gait, and eventually even arthritis. In many cases, non-surgical treatments can make a big difference.

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Shin Splints

Running on uneven surfaces or with worn-out shoes can cause the condition every runner hates: shin splints. Swelling in the shins caused by the shin bone repeatedly pulling a muscle in the leg, and can be treated with over-the-counter NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, and better training habits (and shoes).

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Shoe Inserts

From custom-made to over-the-counter, shoe inserts provide support and help align the foot with the knees, hips, and back. They can help with pain, improving foot function, and addressing foot deformities.

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Tailors Bunion

Bunionette – Like a bunion, the tailor’s bunion is usually caused by a deformity in foot structure, only this type of bunion affects the opposite side of the foot. If pain continues despite non-surgical treatment like orthiotics, padding, and icing, surgery will usually be considered.

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Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Like its sister syndrome, carpal tunnel, tarsal tunnel can occur when the nerve is pinched, resulting in shooting pains, numbness, and tingling, burning feelings. A number of non-surgical options, like bracing and physical therapy can do wonders for tarsal tunnel, but occasionally surgery is necessary for certain cases.

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Toe Pain

Also known as Hammertoe. An imbalance between muscles and tendons can cause toes to restrict, resulting in hammertoes. Irritation, corns, and difficulty wearing shoes make hammertoes an uncomfortable condition. Surgery could be needed to correct the toes if non-surgical options don’t work.

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Ulcers

When the outer layers of the skin are injured and deeper layers are exposed due to injury, extensive bed rest, or ill-fitting shoes, it’s called an ulcer. Ulcers put sufferers at risk for more serious infections, and should be treated promptly.

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